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Family Fair in Bettendorf

BrighterDawnsFair

Join us on November 16th in Park Slope!

We’re having a fundraiser on November 16th in Brooklyn, NY to support initiatives for clean water and sanitation in Bangladesh. There will be speakers, video presentations of our work, and a silent auction with some cool stuff. Hope to see you there! Click here to RSVP.

We're having a fundraiser on November 16th in Brooklyn, NY to support initiatives for clean water and sanitation in Bangladesh. There will be speakers, video presentations of our work, and a silent auction with some cool stuff. Hope to see you there! Click here to RSVP.

Brighter Dawns Poster 2 Revised 8.5x11 (1)

Testimonials from the people

To keep our projects relevant to the people of Ward 12, we asked some of our seminar attendees what they thought of our efforts so far. Here’s how one of them responded:   TRANSLATION: My loving Tasmia Apu: Take my salam. Hope you are doing well by the grace of Almighty.  I always pray to […]

To keep our projects relevant to the people of Ward 12, we asked some of our seminar attendees what they thought of our efforts so far. Here's how one of them responded:   TRANSLATION: My loving Tasmia Apu: Take my salam. Hope you are doing well by the grace of Almighty.  I always pray to Allah so that He keeps you safe.. The help you have provided us visiting Bangladesh can not be explained in words. On behalf of all of us, we express our thanks and heartfelt love to your organization “Brighter Dawn”.  We never had received this kind of help from any one before. It taught us the humanity and moral in human again by providing the simple necessity of human life---water and a clean sanitary pad. The tube well for drinking water is so helpful to us.  No longer have we needed to face the hardship to go long distances for fetching the drinking water. Thanks, (no name)  

Messages from Our Supporters

My Summer Experience with Brighter Dawns

by Fahad Quazi It’s an amazing experience to work with Brighter Dawns. I was born in Bangladesh but unfortunately I have seen the hard-working people but never had a chance to visit the slums personally. Brighter Dawns helped me to meet with people in slums and their stories have a huge impact in my life. […]

by Fahad Quazi It's an amazing experience to work with Brighter Dawns. I was born in Bangladesh but unfortunately I have seen the hard-working people but never had a chance to visit the slums personally. Brighter Dawns helped me to meet with people in slums and their stories have a huge impact in my life. People who are living in the slum are very helpful and their experiences faced daily are so different from us. They almost fight each day but still they try living a life very meaningful and all are very happy in whichever situation they are living. Of course some have complains but they still try to cope each day with happiness. Their stories really touch my heart and I’m grateful to Brighter Dawn for just an amazing journey. I hope and pray that I can keep on working on via of Brighter Dawns and try to touch the heart of people in slums. Brighter Dawns campaign helped a lot of people who have no knowledge about how to live a hygienic life. Brighter Dawn goal is to spread knowledge about living a healthy life. We try to know about people needs and work accordingly. They were facing difficulties of getting water and Brighter Dawns solved their problems by installing tube well and also latrine for cleaning environment. We try to setup few seminars with the help of some experts and attending those seminars was just a beautiful moment of my life. Children in the seminar were so happy to see us. Our guidance towards the children was a big impact to their life. The experts were giving knowledge about hygiene and how to have clean hands. Their acceptance to the topic was so lovely and also they contribute accordingly. We also setup women seminar and all took time off from their family chores to attend it. They were all ready to gain knowledge about how to live a healthy lifestyle. Within the short time they are punctual and their contribution towards our discussion was accepted by all them and some even said to continue their lifestyle as far they can after knowing about hygiene and the benefits of keeping oneself clean. I got a chance to visit Ward 12, 13 and 15 in Khalishpur, Khulna.  Mainly in Ward 12, I have experience people living there are not speaking Bengali. They are speaking Urdu and Bengali mix. So, I ask a family aren’t you guys are Bengali. They said our family is Bengali but people living here are mostly Bihar and their language is Urdu. So, living with them we are used to speak in Urdu. Bihar are people mainly living in Bangladesh who didn’t leave Bangladesh after the Independence. It’s good to see that Brighter Dawns is helping whoever in needs but not only Bengali people.  These sorts of experiences I never faced in my life before though I lived in Bangladesh for a long time. Through Brighter Dawns I keep on gaining more and more experiences and it is just making me feel proud about the initiative we took to help people and survey their wants and needs.

Whirlwind to the White House: Brighter Dawns’ Trip to Washington

by Tasmiha Khan   When I arrived in Washington on Wednesday, July 11, the feeling was surreal. Through the grace of God, the Offices of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships and of Social Innovation and Civic Participation had invited me to the White House. I would be participating in a forum to discuss the important role that […]

by Tasmiha Khan   When I arrived in Washington on Wednesday, July 11, the feeling was surreal. Through the grace of God, the Offices of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships and of Social Innovation and Civic Participation had invited me to the White House. I would be participating in a forum to discuss the important role that faith-based social innovators play in expanding opportunity and addressing social issues.  Senior Administration officials as well as leading faith-based social innovators from around the country came together for the event. That afternoon, I attended a series of briefings, panels, and small-and-large group discussions that explored how faith-based organizations are creating innovative models and entrepreneurial ventures to make a positive impact on our economy and our society serving our most vulnerable communities – a topic that is very important to me and my work with Brighter Dawns.  The main focus was to learn from local innovators and social entrepreneurs who work to extend opportunity and strengthen communities across the country. Our goal was two-fold: (1) to celebrate the tremendous role of faith-based innovators in creating jobs, expanding opportunity, and strengthening communities and  (2) to identify common threads and themes that can help organizations  serve their communities. When Brighter Dawns first began in 2010, I had no idea that we would be honored to one day speak about our work at the center of US government. I met in person with advisors to President Obama from the Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships and Mr. and the Office of Social Innovation and Civic Participation. At this conference of 150 people, majority of whom were working professionals, Brighter Dawns stood out as one of the youngest organizations present. This goes to show that no work should be considered trivial and that the power of youth should not be taken lightly. With dedication and determination, no task is too complex. On the behalf of the Brighter Dawns Executive Team, I want to thank you for all your past and continued support, and for believing in us.  This trip would not have been possible without the support of Amber Hacker from Interfaith Youth Core, the Board Members of National Grid, and countless others who have helped us along the way. Whether it was through your time, finances, or other resources, know that you are instrumental to our success. This journey to the White House was a momentous occasion for us all, and I would like to thank you all for making it possible. With your help, we can take Brighter Dawns to new heights.

Introducing Matt Freeman: Our Newest Board Member

Matthew Freeman, PhD MPH is currently an Assistant Professor and the first Rose Salamone Gangarosa Scholar in Sanitation and Safe Water in the Department of Environmental Health at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University.  He graduated from Wesleyan University in 2000 as a biology major and traveling through Central and South America, […]

Matthew Freeman, PhD MPH is currently an Assistant Professor and the first Rose Salamone Gangarosa Scholar in Sanitation and Safe Water in the Department of Environmental Health at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University.  He graduated from Wesleyan University in 2000 as a biology major and traveling through Central and South America, working on an ambulance in Guatemala and volunteering for CARE in Bolivia, Dr. Freeman received his MPH in Global Environmental Health from the Rollins School of Public Health in 2005.  His Masters thesis focused on promotion of household water treatment in Western Kenya with the CDC.  Following his MPH, Matt returned to Western Kenya for 2 years where he managed the research for a CARE-led project assessing the health and educational impacts of water, sanitation,  and hygiene improvements in primary schools.  In 2011, he completed his PhD in Infectious and Tropical Disease and was appointed to the Department of Environmental Health.  Dr. Freeman currently has ongoing research projects in India, Kenya, Ethiopia, Ghana, and Mali; his work focuses on equitable access, health and educational impacts, and monitoring and evaluation of improved access to water, sanitation, and hygiene.  He is specifically interested in understanding the complementary health effects of deworming and sanitation and hygiene improvements.  He works closely with a number of non-governmental organizations, including CARE, WaterAid, and Save the Children among others.  

Coming of Age as an Organization: Brighter Dawns in 2012

by Kimberly Muellers   On a stifling July day in Baltimore, I found myself in a room full of people – doctors, their husbands and wives, their children – and I suddenly felt the weight of the real world fall on me. I was there, at the Bangladeshi Medical Association of North America’s annual conference, […]

by Kimberly Muellers   On a stifling July day in Baltimore, I found myself in a room full of people - doctors, their husbands and wives, their children - and I suddenly felt the weight of the real world fall on me. I was there, at the Bangladeshi Medical Association of North America's annual conference, to represent Brighter Dawns and present our cause to an audience. My colleagues and classmates at Wesleyan University had given dozens of presentations, ran plenty of booths at lectures and conferences, so this should have been old hat. But as I looked around the room at BMANA, full of medical professionals from across the continent, I realized that this was different. I wasn't at Wesleyan anymore, and though the cause was the same, I had to reflect on how Brighter Dawns fit in to this new situation. Although Brighter Dawns has been a registered charity for over a year and a half, our existence as an organization has always been tied to the student status of its founders, for better or for worse. While many in the non-profit world laud the enthusiasm and originality that comes with youth, our identity as a young organization has also hindered us at times. Donors, partners and advisers are skeptical of our ability to make a positive impact, concerned that we don't understand the complex world of international development. I have been told, often by those who mean well, that other non-profits have tried to tackle the issues of poverty and health disparity for years and had found all the solutions. But at BMANA, I came to understand the importance of our position as a young organization, and the potential for us to grow now that we have graduated. While many organizations run by college students remain in that demographic, we set our sights on a broader field from the beginning: we wanted to reach as many people as possible, and improve as many lives as we could. We reached out to college students, businesspeople, academics, doctors and many others, and discovered that people from all walks of life are compelled by a good cause. The people I met at BMANA were all working for the same goals as us: to improve the health of others in whatever way they could. Generosity, compassion and a connection to Bangladesh's rich, cultural identity inspired many people to offer us advice and support. Seeing that these professionals had confidence both in me, a nervous young person in a room full of experienced doctors, and in us, a fledgling organization, my own hopes for Brighter Dawns were reignited. It's true that we are young, and we are still learning; but this is what gives us the potential to change the world. As Americans doing non-profit work in Bangladesh, one of the most important things for us to succeed is to gain an understanding of the people we seek to help. And as recent college graduates, learning is an essential part of our lives: every day we seek knowledge in classes, at a new job, in a new place. This hunger for knowledge has driven us to keep working with Brighter Dawns after graduation, since the more we know, the more we feel compelled to find solutions to the water and sanitation crisis in Bangladesh. For some, it would have been easy to walk away and leave this work behind as a relic of their college years. But with the help of the countless advisers, volunteers and supporters who have guided us along the way, I feel confident that Brighter Dawns can continue to thrive through the energy of those young and old who have been drawn to our cause. With this energy, thirst for knowledge and the spark of innovation, we can fight the specter of waterborne disease in ever more effective ways, and bring brighter days to Bangladesh.

Whirlwind to the White House: Brighter Dawns’ Trip to Washington

When I arrived in Washington on Wednesday, July 11, the feeling was surreal. Through the grace of God, the Offices of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships and of Social Innovation and Civic Participation had invited me to the White House. I would be participating in a forum to discuss the important role that faith-based social innovators play […]

When I arrived in Washington on Wednesday, July 11, the feeling was surreal. Through the grace of God, the Offices of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships and of Social Innovation and Civic Participation had invited me to the White House. I would be participating in a forum to discuss the important role that faith-based social innovators play in expanding opportunity and addressing social issues.  Senior Administration officials as well as leading faith-based social innovators from around the country came together for the event.   That afternoon, I attended a series of briefings, panels, and small-and-large group discussions that explored how faith-based organizations are creating innovative models and entrepreneurial ventures to make a positive impact on our economy and our society serving our most vulnerable communities - a topic that is very important to me and my work with Brighter Dawns.  The main focus was to learn from local innovators and social entrepreneurs who work to extend opportunity and strengthen communities across the country. Our goal was two-fold: (1) to celebrate the tremendous role of faith-based innovators in creating jobs, expanding opportunity, and strengthening communities and  (2) to identify common threads and themes that can help organizations  serve their communities.   When Brighter Dawns first began in 2010, I had no idea that we would be honored to one day speak about our work at the center of US government. I met in person with advisors to President Obama from the Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships and Mr. and the Office of Social Innovation and Civic Participation. At this conference of 150 people, majority of whom were working professionals, Brighter Dawns stood out as one of the youngest organizations present. This goes to show that no work should be considered trivial and that the power of youth should not be taken lightly. With dedication and determination, no task is too complex. On the behalf of the Brighter Dawns Executive Team, I want to thank you for all your past and continued support, and for believing in us.  This trip would not have been possible without the support of Amber Hacker from Interfaith Youth Core, the Board Members of National Grid, and countless others who have helped us along the way. Whether it was through your time, finances, or other resources, know that you are instrumental to our success. This journey to the White House was a momentous occasion for us all, and I would like to thank you all for making it possible. With your help, we can take Brighter Dawns to new heights. - Tasmiha Khan Founder & CEO of Brighter Dawns

Watch our feature on ABCnews!

Tasmiha and Tarmim Khan were recently featured on ABCnews, which covered how their trips to Bangladesh led to the formation of Brighter Dawns. Watch it below! Or click here!

Tasmiha and Tarmim Khan were recently featured on ABCnews, which covered how their trips to Bangladesh led to the formation of Brighter Dawns. Watch it below! Or click here!
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